Aketon

See Acton

Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases. .

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  • AKETON — apud Thom. Walsinghamum in Eduardo III. Indutus autem fuit Episcopus quâdam armaturâ, quam Aketon vulgariter appellamus: Sagum militare est, quod alias Gambezonem vocabant; ex Gall. Hoqueton aut Hauqueton; seu potius ex Cambrico Britannico Aciwm …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Aketon — Ak e*ton, n. [Obs.] See {Acton}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Aketon — ACTON, AKETON, HACKETON A tunic or cassock, made of buckram or buckskin stuffed with cotton, and sometimes covered with silk and quilted with gold thread. It was worn under the hauberk or coat of mail. In a wardrobe account, dated 1212,… …   Dictionary of the English textile terms

  • aketon — /ak teuhn/, n. Armor. acton. * * * aketon, toun obs. var. acton, haqueton …   Useful english dictionary

  • aketon — /ak teuhn/, n. Armor. acton. * * * …   Universalium

  • aketon — noun A stuffed jacket worn under the mail, or (later) a jacket plated with mail …   Wiktionary

  • Aketon — Quilted garment worn under armour (see gambeson, below) to absorb shock and impact. The term originated with Crusaders and is said to derive from the word cotton. ♦ Shirt like garment of buckram stuffed with cotton, worn as padding under the… …   Medieval glossary

  • Acton — Aketon A padded, stuffed vest or undergarment worn beneath *mail. [< Ar. al qutun = cotton] …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Gambeson — A gambeson (or aketon or padded jack) is a padded defensive jacket, worn as armour separately, or combined with mail or plate armour. Gambeson were produced with a sewing technique called quilting. Usually constructed of linen or wool, the… …   Wikipedia

  • Acton — ACTON, AKETON, HACKETON A tunic or cassock, made of buckram or buckskin stuffed with cotton, and sometimes covered with silk and quilted with gold thread. It was worn under the hauberk or coat of mail. In a wardrobe account, dated 1212,… …   Dictionary of the English textile terms

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